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Health : Black Pleasure is Not Dangerous
DAVE on February 7, 2017 at 9:16 am


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a study in 2016 that declared that, if current diagnosis rates persist, half of all Black men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States would eventually be diagnosed with HIV.

Inside the Black, LGBTQ community, the HIV narrative is far from unfamiliar—it’s taken the lives of many of our loved ones and continues to show disproportionate rates among our youth. But as we figure out how to curve these rates as a community, particularly as we recognize today as National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, there’s something that we need to ensure that we are not sacrificing—pleasure.

Within mainstream media, conversations about us and HIV tend to carry this notion of “risk.” Having condomless sex, multiple sex partners, exclusive sexual networks, and experiencing racism/homophobia are said to put us “at-risk” for being diagnosed with HIV.

While there is validity in learning about factors that contribute to higher HIV rates, at times I fear that we internalize these messages to mean that we ourselves, as beings, are “risky.” At the root of the homophobia that so many of us unfortunately have and continue to experience is a disdain for pleasure between individuals of the same gender—a disdain for the desire and longing that motivates us to identify as part of the LGBTQ community to begin with.

As a community, we should not see ourselves and the expression of our desire as a means of acquiring a disease—our pleasure, our love, and our livelihood exhibits a value inconceivably grander than that. Together let’s frame HIV prevention tactics as something to be considered in sexual decision-making, but not internalized as a reflection of our innate riskiness. As a community, it is pivotal that we authentically cherish and embody our desires (or lack of desires) not only as an act of self-love, but one of liberation.

To all the Black, LGBTQ folks out there, regardless of your HIV status, your pleasure is not risky.BThe way in which you express love is not risky. And, most importantly, you, as a human being, are not risky.




 
Post Posted: 17 days ago 
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@_cosber_ @ben_slays @categorysix @1990slegaleye @munificentmrm @rq1991 @avatar_merhawi @skyee_high @stutterz_89 @oye @goon_nation85 @fistraisedhigh @dalasthoodnikka @trast @zachskye20 @kijuju_reaper @srskeetzalot @kemetprince @justin26 @ll_x-man_ll @nini1 @70cadillac @cai3030 @theahamoment @lilkikisobossy @tony26598 @kouhai @kissyouforhours @s3npai @killagangbanger @pct-man @c-dotti @profit_maker @devil87 @gahotlanta @ldn_photoboy @2game @thug_passion1 @black-treat @bgcbstkptsecret @dr-skeetz @kalikingbed @justbeyou29 @chantmag @ms_gay_2_u @3missedcallz @jdee2014 @darcether @grossie @lilhubby @phutt89 @miles-morales @snexual @sportyblond @jdee2014 @the_take_overr @rollz_royce @texson @the_kake_over @jdee2014 @dr-skeetz @famous-af @blknstuff @troopisbanned @jwoodz0813 @jacobs_fine @mrrevisitd @khaoticelation @betterthanuno @jmk27 @naughty_nites @sassydroid2017 @maybeitsmelanin @thumppper @ginko @impeccable_king @anghellic @ralston30 @olive-p @dorkie_tomboi
 
Post Posted: 17 days ago 
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this was saying a whole lot of nothing.
but i guess.
 
Post Posted: 17 days ago 
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17 days ago

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Health : Black Pleasure is Not Dangerous
DAVE on February 7, 2017 at 9:16 am


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a study in 2016 that declared that, if current diagnosis rates persist, half of all Black men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States would eventually be diagnosed with HIV.

Inside the Black, LGBTQ community, the HIV narrative is far from unfamiliar—it’s taken the lives of many of our loved ones and continues to show disproportionate rates among our youth. But as we figure out how to curve these rates as a community, particularly as we recognize today as National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, there’s something that we need to ensure that we are not sacrificing—pleasure.

Within mainstream media, conversations about us and HIV tend to carry this notion of “risk.” Having condomless sex, multiple sex partners, exclusive sexual networks, and experiencing racism/homophobia are said to put us “at-risk” for being diagnosed with HIV.

While there is validity in learning about factors that contribute to higher HIV rates, at times I fear that we internalize these messages to mean that we ourselves, as beings, are “risky.” At the root of the homophobia that so many of us unfortunately have and continue to experience is a disdain for pleasure between individuals of the same gender—a disdain for the desire and longing that motivates us to identify as part of the LGBTQ community to begin with.

As a community, we should not see ourselves and the expression of our desire as a means of acquiring a disease—our pleasure, our love, and our livelihood exhibits a value inconceivably grander than that. Together let’s frame HIV prevention tactics as something to be considered in sexual decision-making, but not internalized as a reflection of our innate riskiness. As a community, it is pivotal that we authentically cherish and embody our desires (or lack of desires) not only as an act of self-love, but one of liberation.

To all the Black, LGBTQ folks out there, regardless of your HIV status, your pleasure is not risky.BThe way in which you express love is not risky. And, most importantly, you, as a human being, are not risky.
I ALWAYS wrap it up baby. I ain't going out like dat!
_________________
 
Post Posted: 17 days ago 
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17 days ago

this was saying a whole lot of nothing.
but i guess.

Show some respect to our Dad!
_________________
 
Post Posted: 17 days ago 
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Thanks!



 
Post Posted: 17 days ago 
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17 days ago

this was saying a whole lot of nothing.
but i guess.

Shocked sis!
 
Post Posted: 17 days ago 
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17 days ago

this was saying a whole lot of nothing.
but i guess.

Id imagine that to someone whos quantitatively more than just his sexuality and knows better than to internalize negative mainstream messages about black gayness would find this essay uninteresting. BUT I found it to be a very simple and well stated segment that reminds the reader that our intimacy, sexual recreation, and our wants for pleasure is not a social health risk...Im sure even youd agree with that............
 
Post Posted: 17 days ago 
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17 days ago

this was saying a whole lot of nothing.
but i guess.

17 days ago

Id imagine that to someone whos quantitatively more than just his sexuality and knows better than to internalize negative mainstream messages about black gayness would find this essay uninteresting. BUT I found it to be a very simple and well stated segment that reminds the reader that our intimacy, sexual recreation, and our wants for pleasure is not a social health risk...Im sure even youd agree with that............

yes bew.
 
Post Posted: 17 days ago 
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17 days ago

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Health : Black Pleasure is Not Dangerous
DAVE on February 7, 2017 at 9:16 am


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a study in 2016 that declared that, if current diagnosis rates persist, half of all Black men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States would eventually be diagnosed with HIV.

Inside the Black, LGBTQ community, the HIV narrative is far from unfamiliar—it’s taken the lives of many of our loved ones and continues to show disproportionate rates among our youth. But as we figure out how to curve these rates as a community, particularly as we recognize today as National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, there’s something that we need to ensure that we are not sacrificing—pleasure.

Within mainstream media, conversations about us and HIV tend to carry this notion of “risk.” Having condomless sex, multiple sex partners, exclusive sexual networks, and experiencing racism/homophobia are said to put us “at-risk” for being diagnosed with HIV.

While there is validity in learning about factors that contribute to higher HIV rates, at times I fear that we internalize these messages to mean that we ourselves, as beings, are “risky.” At the root of the homophobia that so many of us unfortunately have and continue to experience is a disdain for pleasure between individuals of the same gender—a disdain for the desire and longing that motivates us to identify as part of the LGBTQ community to begin with.

As a community, we should not see ourselves and the expression of our desire as a means of acquiring a disease—our pleasure, our love, and our livelihood exhibits a value inconceivably grander than that. Together let’s frame HIV prevention tactics as something to be considered in sexual decision-making, but not internalized as a reflection of our innate riskiness. As a community, it is pivotal that we authentically cherish and embody our desires (or lack of desires) not only as an act of self-love, but one of liberation.

To all the Black, LGBTQ folks out there, regardless of your HIV status, your pleasure is not risky.BThe way in which you express love is not risky. And, most importantly, you, as a human being, are not risky.

17 days ago

I ALWAYS wrap it up baby. I ain't going out like dat!

I mean...I hope that goes without saying with the sexual Olympics you like to participate in these days, but this message was more for your inner-homo. Its just simply reminding you that being who and what you are is not a risk as mainstreama would want everyone to believe......#expressyourself
 
Post Posted: 17 days ago 
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17 days ago

Thanks!

YW. Tell A Friend.........



 
Post Posted: 17 days ago 
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I've been saying this shit for the longest!

I truly believe men and women have WAY more unprotected sex than the LGBT community. The overpopulation of this planet is a clear sign of that.

I'm so sick of people acting like the beauty in same-sex sex is nothing but a risk for HIV. Yes, I believe people should be mindful of the POSSIBLE consequences that come from unprotected sex with ANYBODY. I just don't think it's right for people to automatically think of STDs and HIV/AIDS when they think of gay sex.

Foh with that dumb shit....
 
Post Posted: 17 days ago 
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17 days ago

I've been saying this shit for the longest!

I truly believe men and women have WAY more unprotected sex than the LGBT community. The overpopulation of this planet is a clear sign of that.

I'm so sick of people acting like the beauty in same-sex sex is nothing but a risk for HIV. Yes, I believe people should be mindful of the POSSIBLE consequences that come from unprotected sex with ANYBODY. I just don't think it's right for people to automatically think of STDs and HIV/AIDS when they think of gay sex.

Foh with that dumb shit....

My Sentiments Exactly.........
 
Post Posted: 17 days ago 
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I don't sleep with infected people. I'm good.
 
Post Posted: 16 days ago 
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17 days ago

I don't sleep with infected people. I'm good.

Why am I not surprised thats what you took away from this article............
 
Post Posted: 16 days ago 
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I am just happy that I have made it this far with my good health.

I don't desire sex anymore for pleasure it's only a physical extension of the pleasure I receive from love and companionship.

I'm glad that I have grown to the point of being able to embrace celibacy until finding a suitable mate.
 
Post Posted: 15 days ago 
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17 days ago

I am just happy that I have made it this far with my good health.

I don't desire sex anymore for pleasure it's only a physical extension of the pleasure I receive from love and companionship.

I'm glad that I have grown to the point of being able to embrace celibacy until finding a suitable mate.

Emmmmhmmmmmm. I hear you, Jay.........😏😏😏😏😏😏
 
Post Posted: 15 days ago 
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Post Posted: 15 days ago 
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17 days ago

I am just happy that I have made it this far with my good health.

I don't desire sex anymore for pleasure it's only a physical extension of the pleasure I receive from love and companionship.

I'm glad that I have grown to the point of being able to embrace celibacy until finding a suitable mate.

15 days ago

Emmmmhmmmmmm. I hear you, Jay.........😏😏😏😏😏😏

Fa real boo!!!
 
Post Posted: 15 days ago 
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okay
_________________
 
Post Posted: 15 days ago 
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oye

17 days ago

Code:
Health : Black Pleasure is Not Dangerous
DAVE on February 7, 2017 at 9:16 am


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a study in 2016 that declared that, if current diagnosis rates persist, half of all Black men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States would eventually be diagnosed with HIV.

Inside the Black, LGBTQ community, the HIV narrative is far from unfamiliar—it’s taken the lives of many of our loved ones and continues to show disproportionate rates among our youth. But as we figure out how to curve these rates as a community, particularly as we recognize today as National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, there’s something that we need to ensure that we are not sacrificing—pleasure.

Within mainstream media, conversations about us and HIV tend to carry this notion of “risk.” Having condomless sex, multiple sex partners, exclusive sexual networks, and experiencing racism/homophobia are said to put us “at-risk” for being diagnosed with HIV.

While there is validity in learning about factors that contribute to higher HIV rates, at times I fear that we internalize these messages to mean that we ourselves, as beings, are “risky.” At the root of the homophobia that so many of us unfortunately have and continue to experience is a disdain for pleasure between individuals of the same gender—a disdain for the desire and longing that motivates us to identify as part of the LGBTQ community to begin with.

As a community, we should not see ourselves and the expression of our desire as a means of acquiring a disease—our pleasure, our love, and our livelihood exhibits a value inconceivably grander than that. Together let’s frame HIV prevention tactics as something to be considered in sexual decision-making, but not internalized as a reflection of our innate riskiness. As a community, it is pivotal that we authentically cherish and embody our desires (or lack of desires) not only as an act of self-love, but one of liberation.

To all the Black, LGBTQ folks out there, regardless of your HIV status, your pleasure is not risky.BThe way in which you express love is not risky. And, most importantly, you, as a human being, are not risky.
Just wrap it up! people regardless should use common sense.
 
Post Posted: 14 days ago 
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17 days ago

Code:
Health : Black Pleasure is Not Dangerous
DAVE on February 7, 2017 at 9:16 am


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a study in 2016 that declared that, if current diagnosis rates persist, half of all Black men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States would eventually be diagnosed with HIV.

Inside the Black, LGBTQ community, the HIV narrative is far from unfamiliar—it’s taken the lives of many of our loved ones and continues to show disproportionate rates among our youth. But as we figure out how to curve these rates as a community, particularly as we recognize today as National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, there’s something that we need to ensure that we are not sacrificing—pleasure.

Within mainstream media, conversations about us and HIV tend to carry this notion of “risk.” Having condomless sex, multiple sex partners, exclusive sexual networks, and experiencing racism/homophobia are said to put us “at-risk” for being diagnosed with HIV.

While there is validity in learning about factors that contribute to higher HIV rates, at times I fear that we internalize these messages to mean that we ourselves, as beings, are “risky.” At the root of the homophobia that so many of us unfortunately have and continue to experience is a disdain for pleasure between individuals of the same gender—a disdain for the desire and longing that motivates us to identify as part of the LGBTQ community to begin with.

As a community, we should not see ourselves and the expression of our desire as a means of acquiring a disease—our pleasure, our love, and our livelihood exhibits a value inconceivably grander than that. Together let’s frame HIV prevention tactics as something to be considered in sexual decision-making, but not internalized as a reflection of our innate riskiness. As a community, it is pivotal that we authentically cherish and embody our desires (or lack of desires) not only as an act of self-love, but one of liberation.

To all the Black, LGBTQ folks out there, regardless of your HIV status, your pleasure is not risky.BThe way in which you express love is not risky. And, most importantly, you, as a human being, are not risky.
Thank you for sharing this. I enjoyed reading it. I try to put people on to not passing the shit on every chance I get.
 
Post Posted: 14 days ago 
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17 days ago

Code:
Health : Black Pleasure is Not Dangerous
DAVE on February 7, 2017 at 9:16 am


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a study in 2016 that declared that, if current diagnosis rates persist, half of all Black men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States would eventually be diagnosed with HIV.

Inside the Black, LGBTQ community, the HIV narrative is far from unfamiliar—it’s taken the lives of many of our loved ones and continues to show disproportionate rates among our youth. But as we figure out how to curve these rates as a community, particularly as we recognize today as National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, there’s something that we need to ensure that we are not sacrificing—pleasure.

Within mainstream media, conversations about us and HIV tend to carry this notion of “risk.” Having condomless sex, multiple sex partners, exclusive sexual networks, and experiencing racism/homophobia are said to put us “at-risk” for being diagnosed with HIV.

While there is validity in learning about factors that contribute to higher HIV rates, at times I fear that we internalize these messages to mean that we ourselves, as beings, are “risky.” At the root of the homophobia that so many of us unfortunately have and continue to experience is a disdain for pleasure between individuals of the same gender—a disdain for the desire and longing that motivates us to identify as part of the LGBTQ community to begin with.

As a community, we should not see ourselves and the expression of our desire as a means of acquiring a disease—our pleasure, our love, and our livelihood exhibits a value inconceivably grander than that. Together let’s frame HIV prevention tactics as something to be considered in sexual decision-making, but not internalized as a reflection of our innate riskiness. As a community, it is pivotal that we authentically cherish and embody our desires (or lack of desires) not only as an act of self-love, but one of liberation.

To all the Black, LGBTQ folks out there, regardless of your HIV status, your pleasure is not risky.BThe way in which you express love is not risky. And, most importantly, you, as a human being, are not risky.

14 days ago

Thank you for sharing this. I enjoyed reading it. I try to put people on to not passing the shit on every chance I get.

I mean...thats a good thing..but this article was speaking more about having a normal pleasure based outlook vs thinking all gay sex is risky behavior as the mainstream community would have everyone believe......
 
Post Posted: 7 days ago 
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17 days ago

Every year due to a invention databases, whose access data but on sexual practice than a biological antecessor on healthier?

Butterscotch beacon!

.........Odd.
_________________
Money Don't Make You Happy & A Man Don't Make You Fancy😎
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