logo
Search
 
POST NEWTrast's Posts
Author Message
Back to top
Forum :  Topic : The Last Week of Summer Basketball this Week

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 15 hrs ago    Post subject: The Last Week of Summer Basketball this Week

It has been a good regular season, and a good playoff too, but not as many games as last summer. Hopefully the neighborhood where the Goodman League plays will not be so changed that the games will have to move in a couple of years. But they tore down the entire Farm, and are replacing it with new housing and shopping, and we all know what that normally means in DC. GENTRIFICATION!




If the Goodman leaves, um leaving too. Summer basketball is the best part about "former" Chocolate City (DC) for me.
Back to top
Forum :  Topic : ATLANTA PRIDE...

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 15 hrs ago    Post subject: ATLANTA PRIDE...

Nope. Um banned in all the clubs in the ATL. Something about a dirty old man, running around groping folks, and other untrue BS...



Back to top
Forum :  Topic : So i recently came back from vacationing in Mexico...

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 15 hrs ago    Post subject: So i recently came back from vacationing in Mexico...

I usually like going on vacations alone, and seeing what happens. For me part of the fun, is the anticipation of possibly meeting someone HOT in a place no one knows me, and where I feel free to just go for it.

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Threesome planning ?

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 15 hrs ago    Post subject: Threesome planning ?

In the old old days, (pre-HIV) you could just visit a dark room (the basement rooms in a gay club for freaks) and join in.



Nowadays...
Back to top
Forum :  Topic : I get it

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 15 hrs ago    Post subject: I get it

Butt um like a fine whine. I only get butter with time.

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Most attractive dude in this photo

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 15 hrs ago    Post subject: Most attractive dude in this photo

I like the black framed window and the painting on the left.

Back to top
Forum : General Discussions Topic : Ppl ask me what my type is.. Coby White, looks + personality

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 15 hrs ago    Post subject: Ppl ask me what my type is.. Coby White, looks + personality

Yep, He's got something special. Not sure what it is though.



Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Threesome planning ?

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 2 days ago    Post subject: Threesome planning ?

Used to be, you could go on CL and order out. There was this really hot pair that worked out of a local hotel on weekends. The dark chocolate dude was hung like a horse, and the light skinned brother wasn't far behind.

But the bastards on the hill killed CL Personals for everybody instead of weeding out the pimps and sex slavers. Lazy asses!

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Which dude is more your type

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 2 days ago    Post subject: Which dude is more your type

3 days ago

You're my type.

We should share him.


Dark chocolate is runner up.

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Ever experienced buyers remorse when it comes to sex...?

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 2 days ago    Post subject: Ever experienced buyers remorse when it comes to sex...?

Hell NAW! All fucks is good fucks! As long as you use protection.

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : I hop Pose wins both their Emmys next month

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 2 days ago    Post subject: I hop Pose wins both their Emmys next month



Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Time To Push The Parasites Out Of Town

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 2 days ago    Post subject: Time To Push The Parasites Out Of Town

Yes, we have to start our own businesses in our own communities, like everyone else, but that takes capital. They need to hurry up, apologize, and pay reparations, so the healing of our communities can begin.

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Is self-harm worth an attention-seeking selfie?

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 2 days ago    Post subject: Is self-harm worth an attention-seeking selfie?

I bet she won't do it again. I am glad someone posted the video, so hopefully someone else with the same dumb idea will think twice.

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : I've Never Had Relations With A Gay Man...

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 2 days ago    Post subject: I've Never Had Relations With A Gay Man...

Yes, we the best! Much better. Bend over, sis.

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : The ghost of Steve Irwin has been beckoned.

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 2 days ago    Post subject: The ghost of Steve Irwin has been beckoned.

Hell naw! Lite-brite too cute to be eaten by an alligator.


Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Funny or Cruel?

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 2 days ago    Post subject: Funny or Cruel?

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Invite 1 over for Sunday dinner.

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: Invite 1 over for Sunday dinner.

I am a sucker for wide-open legs on a handsome dude. It gets my attention every time, and my imagination in overdrive. Lol.



Back to top
Forum :  Topic : if you were straight do you think you would be a homo hater?

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: if you were straight do you think you would be a homo hater?

I think I would go through a phase of minor gay-bashing, yeah. It seems part of being straight means being a dick to gays, then maturing and realizing that it's a weak dude's position.

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Finding Your Joy - Are You Happy?

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: Finding Your Joy - Are You Happy?



I think we all have bad days, bad weeks, and longer periods, but are you basically a happy person?



If not, why not? What makes you happy?

For me, I am happy when I can do something to take the pressure off someone else, and I am unhappy when I cannot, which is a lot of the time. But I am happy again if I know I did what I could, and eventually forgive myself for failing in the attempt.

I find joy in little things, like free basketball games, walks through the city, sharing ideas online, calling my mom, and getting calls from friends (people I help on the regular mostly, and short term).

How about you? What makes you smile?
Back to top
Forum :  Topic : What Advice Do You Have for Lil Nas X?

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: What Advice Do You Have for Lil Nas X?

4 days ago

Please do not date or marry a caucasian...

#rememberingMichaelSam

4 days ago

. . .
.
.
.
.
. . . . .. this "advice" has no legitimate rationale to it... it's based on closemindedness and neuroticism ... this mindset won't take you far in life...

4 days ago

i disagree, i'm further than you...

4 days ago

. .
.
.
. .oh... you disagree?
.
.
. .. . tell me the legitimate rationale as to why this man should take your advice.
.
.
. .. . . . . . further more, it's *farther.... as in you're *farther than me... and congratulations on being *farther than me. i'm sure it'll help you to explicate a reasonable rationale to exclude based on race.

4 days ago

He shouldn't...he should do what he feels is best...

Why asre you in a mood with me..

Ultimately, its my opinion...you know it...and thats kinda the END.

4 days ago

..
.
.
. . . . What mood?
.
. . . . don't u think me entreating you to make better, opend minded decisions will positively impact your life?

4 days ago

Some of us had open-minds and hearts, but learned certain lessons of life through experience. Choosing to stick with ones one kind can be the result of bad experiences, and experiencing the divisive power of race in relationships.

You should not judge someone else's choices if you do not know their story. Racism is real, and race in America remains and always has been a factor when if comes to inter-racial relationships. Asians were not allowed to marry white folks until 1967 after Loving v. Virginia, same as us blacks. That decision struck down all "anti-miscegenation" laws prior to that time, which made it illegal for inter-racial sex and marriage to protect white folk's sense of superiority.

White supremacy and racism in America is not a myth, is not the result of lack of enlightenment, and it is not a figment of people's imagination unfortunately.

3 days ago

.. .
.

.
.
. . .. . . . do you think Nas X, who's barely out of his teen years, have gone thru those kinds of problems where it caused him to be some sort of race cynic, only sticking to his own?
.
.
. . . . are you aware that the other half of Nas X's success, Old Town Rd, is a middle aged White man?
.
.
. . .. . . if him collaborating with a white man yield such success... do you think it's in Nas X's character to even for one second, to consider such a retarded advice as to preclude whites in his life?

3 days ago

I believe the post you reacted negatively to, he advised Nas, do not date or marry a white man. He said nothing about not working or collaborating with them. There is a difference. And that might be sage advice from someone who has had negative experiences dating white folks. I could very easily give that advice myself, and back it up. But I would not, because some things I believe one should experience firsthand to understand. But that is just me.

3 days ago

. .
.
.
. . .
. . . .... What do you think a marriage is? lol . . .


.
.
. . . . .. . . . . . You've never had any negative experiences in dating anyone else? Everyone else, except white men, were smooth sailing?

3 days ago

You miss the point, the point is the context. White Americans have separated themselves from the rest of us until recently. When I was seven years old, these personal relationships you support were untenable in some parts of the US, because of white supremacy laws on the books.

Now you seem to think there is no difference between relations between minorities and between a white person and a minority. You ignore reality in your insistence that we all be open to it NOW, when just recently it was illegal by their choice.

Sorry but you insult history and context by your insistence, and many people disagree, and feel no need to explain it to you; other than remind you to look at the current state of blacks in America, and the current advantages enjoyed by white Americans, largely due to their TAKEN advantage.

I am glad you have found acceptance in corporate America and everything is going well for you, but you are the exception. Those opportunities you accept and flaunt are not open to most of us by design.

There is a history here, and consequences from that history that linger, not to mention the continuance of that line of supremacy in more subtle ways, which you refuse to see.

And no amount of pulling oneself up by ones bootstraps will overcome the disparity for most blacks, if that were even possible.

Whites do not live in my neighborhood. They probably do not live n Nas' neighborhood, unless his new-found money has transplanted him to theirs. For a forumer to warn him to be careful of the trappings of success and the acceptance that will bring him, is not something you in their world have the necessary perspective to criticize.

We have seen many blacks move into their world and find acceptance, while they are there, only to be dropped, when their money falls away, and their elevation recedes. You are a banker, and Asian, so you have the where-with-all to maintain yourself in their space. Nas probably does not. He could easily become the next Michael Sam. It is more than fair to warn him to be careful with his heart.

And it is sad to listen to you try to admonish the other forumer for doing so. The advice you gave Nas was perfect from you. The advice the other forumer was perfect coming from him. Your criticism of his advice was ignorant, ignorant of context, and ignorant of Nas' highly possible situation.

3 days ago

. .
.
.
.
.. . oh ok . .. . keep wallowing in your self created victimization.. . .
,
.
.
. . . .. and fixated upon the white man's mistreatment... as if any groups of people with african ancestry don't stratify themselves against outsiders...
.
.
. . . .I've seen more black boys get the shit beat out of them by other black ppl by being on the wrong blocs than any white men harassing blk ppl.... in fact, statistics re enforces this.... would you like for me to research this for you?
.
. . . . . . and you think you could've become who you are or amassed what you have by living in any sovereignty where the predominant group is people of african ancestry? lol... delusional....
.
. . . . but hey... "I think, therefore I am...." you have the right to be a victim... you have the right to the conjecture that life with the white man is much more horrible than life with men of African ancestry.... it's you who has to deal with the consequences of these thoughts.... not anyone else.

3 days ago

Code:
Self-created victimization


That says it all for me. I know how you think.

Disparities in educational opportunity, criminal justice system laws and their implementation, wealth gap, housing, income, healthcare, are not wholly self-created. They are largely the result of generations of racism and power being held in white hands.

No need for further discussion. I said what I said. The other forumer gave his good advice, you gave your good avice, and now like those in your position, you feel the need and the power to criticize others who think and whose experiences are different from yours.

Like I said I am glad you have made it, and don't feel like a victim as a result of your "earned" success. But you really do not know other people's lives, and the delusion is on your part, thinking you do.

I am not a victim. I, like you, have made it. But unlike you I know my success was partly a glitch in the system, not just the result of my IQ and hard work. I see that the deck is stacked, and acknowledge that race is a very real factor in America, that there are real victims of racism, and class, and that sometimes no amount of struggle can overcome that.

My solution is not to blame the "victims" or ignore reality, but to demand that the obstacles be removed, that reparations be made, IN ADDITION TO encouraging people to work hard and grind.

Unlike you, I am not calling your truth wrong, I am simply saying it is dishonest in its incompleteness and myopia.

3 days ago

.. .
.
.
.
. oh dat sounds so horrible.... can you point to the world any country where people of African ancestry are more prosperous than those who reside in horrible injusticeful America? lol .. . .
.
.
.
. . . .. . . also, random fact, there are more black millionaires in the city of Atlanta than there are all of subsaharan africa, combined.... what a horrible place for blk ppl, who want to prosper, to work and live... :/

3 days ago

I don\'t think the money itself is the issue. The problem is the flagrant disparity in wealth and income. I lived in AFrica for a little while. Extemely poor people were very happy there. They have much less than many of the non-homeless folks have in the black inner-city ghettos here. They were in it together. Families looked out for one another and their neighbors as many of us do here in the hood. The difference is the promise of American prosperity denied, while seeing the overwhelming whiteness of the faces of those who are prospering in the same city.

But again you shifted the issue to avoid the fact that racism does exist and it is a factor. Because some blacks make it to the middle class despite racism in America, and because there is more black with some money in the richest country on earth than in the poor countries of Africa, does not mean racism does not exist and is not a problem in America.

I hear what you are saying, but you still deny what some of us are saying.

3 days ago

I don't deny that there is some racism here, but we differ about the cause. I think the cause is mainly a direct response to what is seen in these links. You don't think it is a response to what blacks are doing. We have an honest disagreement about both the cause, and the fix. I'm fine with everyone stopping doing all this racial stuff, but Blacks aren't gunna ever take that deal. They want double standards.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BsmF91EFohk/


Blacks just adore using the racially superior saying "I Love Black People."

Do you think it'd be appropriate for Whites to go around on their instagram, facebook, and Twitter saying "I Love White People."

And Whites aren't gunna risk bringing that up, but most of the racism you see is a response to these double standards being used.

Here's something else that is totally divisive, and let me be clear....I think she's a fabulous artist.

https://squareup.com/store/rdc-art-gallery/

I just don't think her hate will ever do anything but increase racial bigotry by Blacks, and increase racism from Whites. At some point, people have to stop all this petty shit, and do something productive. Maybe blacks want hate increased. That's what she is doing. Increasing hate.

And you have black professionals (i.e. CNN's Victor Blackwell) supporting a black supremacist artist. Do you know how quickly a White news anchor would get fired if caught supporting a white supremacist artist?

I don't see her art as hateful. I think those are pictures of black liberationists from the 50s and 60s, and their quotes demanding freedom from white oppression. Sorry if it offends you, but the real hatefulness was from whites back then. Those were the days of Jim Crow, segregation, school busing, anti-miscegenation laws, etc. Their quotes are just defenses against the real hate they faced daily back then.

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Any Website Builders Here? - I Could not Get into BGC Again

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: Any Website Builders Here? - I Could not Get into BGC Again

2019-07-10 08:03:36

What would be the difference in bgc and your site with the same queens on it?

Who knows? I like BGC folks; otherwise, I wouldn't spend so much time here. You are all very insightful, funny, and educational in your own way. I learn something each time I log in.

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Immigration\'s negative impact on Native Blacks

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: Immigration\'s negative impact on Native Blacks

3 days ago

@trast

The real reasons the U.S. became less racist toward Asian Americans

Asian Americans used to be portrayed as the villains. How did they become a "model minority"? (Daron Taylor/The Washington Post)
By Jeff Guo November 29, 2016

Between 1940 and 1970, something remarkable happened to Asian Americans. Not only did they surpass African Americans in average household earnings, but they also closed the wage gap with whites.

Many people credit this upward mobility to investments in education. But according to a recent study by Brown University economist Nathaniel Hilger, schooling rates among Asian Americans didn’t change all that significantly during those three decades. Instead, Hilger’s research suggests that Asian Americans started to earn more because their fellow Americans became less racist toward them.

[The real secret to Asian American success was not education]

How did that happen? About the same time that Asian Americans were climbing the socioeconomic ladder, they also experienced a major shift in their public image. At the outset of the 20th century, Asian Americans had often been portrayed as threatening, exotic and degenerate. But by the 1950s and 1960s, the idea of the model minority had begun to take root. Newspapers often glorified Asian Americans as industrious, law-abiding citizens who kept their heads down and never complained.


Some people think that racism toward Asians diminished because Asians “proved themselves” through their actions. But that is only a sliver of the truth. Then, as now, the stories of successful Asians were elevated, while the stories of less successful Asians were diminished. As historian Ellen Wu explains in her book, “The Color of Success,” the model minority stereotype has a fascinating origin story, one that’s tangled up in geopolitics, the Cold War and the civil rights movement.

To combat racism, minorities in the United States have often attempted to portray themselves as upstanding citizens capable of assimilating into mainstream culture. Asian Americans were no different, Wu writes. Some, like the Chinese, sought respectability by promoting stories about their obedient children and their traditional family values. The Japanese pointed to their wartime service as proof of their shared Americanness.

African Americans in the 1940s made very similar appeals. But in the postwar moment, Wu argues, it was only convenient for political leaders to hear the Asian voices.


The model minority narrative may have started with Asian Americans, but it was quickly co-opted by white politicians who saw it as a tool to win allies in the Cold War. Discrimination was not a good look on the international stage. Embracing Asian Americans “provided a powerful means for the United States to proclaim itself a racial democracy and thereby credentialed to assume the leadership of the free world,” Wu writes. Stories about Asian American success were turned into propaganda.

By the 1960s, anxieties about the civil right movement caused white Americans to further invest in positive portrayals of Asian Americans. The image of the hard-working Asian became an extremely convenient way to deny the demands of African Americans. As Wu describes in her book, both liberal and conservative politicians pumped up the image of Asian Americans as a way to shift the blame for black poverty. If Asians could find success within the system, politicians asked, why couldn’t African Americans?

“The insinuation was that hard work along with unwavering faith in the government and liberal democracy as opposed to political protest were the keys to overcoming racial barriers as well as achieving full citizenship,” she writes.


Recently, Wu and I chatted on the phone about her book and the model minority stereotype — how it was equal parts truth, propaganda and self-enforcing prophecy.

Can you tell us a little bit about the question that got you started on this book?

WU: America in general has had very limited ways of thinking about Asian Americans. There are very few ways in which we exist in the popular imagination. In the mid- to late-19th century, all the way through the late 1940s and 1950s, Asians were thought of as “brown hordes” or as the “yellow peril.” There was the sinister, weird, “Fu Manchu” stereotype.

Yet, by the middle of the 1960s, Asian Americans had undergone this really arresting racial makeover. Political leaders, journalists, social scientists — all these people in the public eye — seemed to suddenly be praising Asian Americans as so-called model minorities.


I thought that might be a very interesting question to try to unravel.

How did these earliest stereotypes — these very negative, nasty images — take root?

Asian Americans first started coming in significant numbers during the California Gold Rush. Chinese immigrants came to do mining, then they ended up working on the Transcontinental Railroad, and agriculture. When those jobs died down, a lot of them moved to the cities where they started working in manufacturing.

At that time, in the 1870s, the economy wasn’t doing that well in California. White American workers were very anxious about keeping their jobs. They looked around and they saw these newcomers who seemed very different from them.

There already had been a long tradition in the Western world of portraying the “Orient” as unknowable and mysterious. American workers started attaching these ideas to the Chinese newcomers, who were an easy target for white American anxieties about the growth of industrial capitalism and the undermining of workers’ autonomy and freedom. They believed that the Chinese threatened American independence and threatened American freedom.


These ideas were particularly popular among the white working class at the time. The momentum started to build in the American West. There was the Workingmen’s Party in California — one of their platforms was “The Chinese must go.” That’s how they rallied people. And they were very successful at it.

By 1882, Congress passed the first of a series of Chinese Exclusion Acts, which was the first time a race- and class-based group — Chinese workers — were singled out by American immigration law. The Chinese Exclusion Acts restricted their entry into the United States and said they couldn’t become naturalized citizens.

What’s really striking is that in the 1890s, the federal government even mandated a Chinese registry. That sounds a lot like this issue of the Muslim registry today, right?

A lot of what you’re describing sounds familiar today — the economic anxiety bleeding into racial anxiety, the targeting of outsiders …


Absolutely. There are a lot of resonances. What’s happening today didn’t spring out of nowhere — it has a very long history in the United States.

Can you describe some of these old stereotypes? I think that most people have some idea from old Hollywood movies, but it’s just such a contrast to how Asians Americans are portrayed today.

The ways in which Americans thought about these “Orientals” hinged a lot on moral differences and on issues of gender, sexuality and family.

Many great historians and scholars have done work on this. The major groups that came before World War II were the Chinese, Japanese, South Asians, Koreans and Filipinos. There were both similarities and differences in how the groups were viewed, but generally they were thought to be threatening — significantly different in a negative sense.


For the most part, a lot of Asian immigrants weren’t Christian, so that was suspect. American Chinatowns had a thriving vice economy, so gambling, prostitution and drugs became popularly associated with Asians. (Of course, some of the same white Americans who were criticizing Asians were also the ones participating in these activities.)

There was this idea of moral depravity. At the time, the Chinese and Filipinos and South Asians in America were mostly single, able-bodied young men, so that also raised a lot of eyebrows. It looked like they were sexually wayward.

If you look at old stereotypical imagery of Asians in political cartoons, the way they tend to be depicted is that they are not aligned with white, middle-class notions of respectable masculinity. There’s the long hair, the flowing clothing that didn’t quite look masculine yet didn’t quite look feminine — or maybe it was something in-between, as some scholars have argued.


The women were also thought of as morally suspect — as prostitutes, sexually promiscuous, that kind of thing.

An important argument in your book is that Asians were complicit in the creation of the model minority myth. The way we talk about this issue today, it’s as if the white majority imposed this stereotype on Asian communities — but your research shows that’s not the case. How did it really get started?

Absolutely. That is a critical point to understand. The model minority myth as we see it today was mainly an unintended outcome of earlier attempts by Asians Americans to be accepted and recognized as human beings. They wanted to be seen as American people who were worthy of respect and dignity.

At lot was at stake. At the time, Asians were living life under an exclusion regime that had many similarities to Jim Crow — not the same as Jim Crow, but certainly a cousin of Jim Crow. There was a whole matrix of laws and discriminatory practices.

By 1924, all immigration from Asia had been completely banned. Asians were considered under the law “aliens ineligible for citizenship.” There were all these racial restrictions to citizenship under the law — and the last of these didn’t fall until 1952.

Asian Americans tended to be restricted to segregated neighborhoods, segregated schools. They often did not have the kind of job prospects that white people had. They would be barred from certain kinds of employment either by law or by custom.

In 1937, a young U.S.-born Japanese-American man lamented that even if you went to college, you could only end up being a “professional carrot-washer.” That was really true for a lot of people. They had very limited options for social mobility. And of course there was also violence — lynchings.

So for Asian Americans, one survival strategy was to portray themselves as “good Americans.”

As you argue in your book, it became increasingly expedient for mainstream Americans to acknowledge, and even amplify, Asian attempts to gain respectability. What changed?

Those claims really start to stick in the 1940s, when the nation was gearing up for global war. American leaders started to worry about the consequences of their domestic racial discrimination policies. They were concerned it would get in the way of forging alliances with other people abroad. That really motivated American leaders and the American people to work on race relations.

During World War II, lawmakers thought that Chinese exclusion made for bad diplomacy. So Congress decided to overturn Chinese exclusion as a goodwill gesture to China, who was America’s Pacific ally.

With the beginning of the Cold War, American policymakers became really attentive to putting their best image out into the world. They were very interested in winning hearts and minds in Asia.

Japan is a very good example. Japan lost the war and the United States took charge of reconstructing Japan in its own image as a rising democratic, capitalist country. And because Japan became such an important ally, that was the moment when Japanese exclusion laws could finally be overturned, which happened in 1952.

Again, people in Congress worried that if we left these laws on the books, it would endanger a billion hearts and minds in the Far East.

It wasn’t just a geopolitical thing right? It seems that by the 1960s, there were other reasons for investing in this image of Asians as upstanding citizens, reasons that were closer to home.

Oh, absolutely. There were definitely domestic reasons for why the idea was appealing that Asians could be considered good American citizens capable of assimilating into American life.

In the 1950s, there were general concerns about maintaining the right kind of home life. There’s this image of the perfect American family — a suburban household with a mom, a dad, two to three kids, a white picket fence. That was the ideal, but it wasn’t always realized. There was a juvenile delinquency panic in the 1950s, a big scare over how the nation’s youth were getting themselves into trouble.

The Chinatown leaders were really smart. They started to peddle stories about Chinese traditional family values and Confucian ethics. They claimed that Chinese children always listened to their elders, were unquestioningly obedient and never got into trouble because after school they would just go to Chinese school.

When I started digging, I found that this idea of this model Chinese family, with the perfect children who always just loved to study and who don’t have time to get into trouble or date — started to circulate quite prominently in the 1950s. That speaks to America’s anxieties about juvenile delinquency.

Also, since these stories were taking place in Chinatowns, it allowed Americans to claim that America had these remaining repositories of traditional Chinese values at a time when the Communist Chinese had completely dismantled them. So there’s this other level where these stories are also anti-Communist — they are doing this other ideological work.

How true were these stories though? How much of this was racial propaganda, and how much of it was rooted in reality?

These are obviously very strategic stories. In 1956, the federal government started to crack down on illegal Chinese immigration, which was in part motivated by the Cold War. So partly, the conservative Chinatown leaders thought this model Chinese family story would do a lot to protect them. They thought this PR campaign would reorient the conversation away from “Communists are sneaking into our country” to “Hey, look at these squeaky-clean, well-behaved children.”

From reading community newspapers in these Chinatowns, we know they also had a lot of concerns about juvenile delinquency. In fact, behind closed doors there were heated disagreements about what to do. One woman in particular — Rose Hum Lee, a sociologist with a PhD from the University of Chicago — wrote lots of books and papers about the problems in Chinatown, and accused leaders of sweeping these problems under the rug.

There were Asian Americans then, as today, at the end of the socioeconomic spectrum. And that segment of the population tends to go unnoticed in these kinds of narratives.

It’s interesting to compare the efforts of the Chinatown leaders to the parallel efforts of leaders in the African American civil rights movement, who also emphasized respectability — who wore their Sunday best on these marches where they were hosed down and attacked by dogs. What’s stunning to me is the contrast. One group’s story is amplified, and the other’s is, well, almost denied.

I think the Japanese American experience also highlights some of this contrast. At the same time in the 1950s, you hear these stories about how the Japanese Americans dramatically recovered from the internment camps, how they accepted their fate. “After internment, many families were scattered across the country, but they took it as an opportunity to assimilate,” that sort of thing.

Japanese Americans aren’t perceived to be doing any kind of direct action, they weren’t perceived to be protesting. A bad thing happened to them, and they moved on, and they were doing okay.

These stories were ideologically useful. They became a model for political cooperation. The ideas solidify in the 1950s. Americans had recast Asians into these citizens capable of assimilating — even if they still saw Asians as somewhat different from whites. And by the 1960s, what becomes important is that these socially mobile, assimilating, politically nonthreatening people were also decidedly not black.

That’s really the key to all this. The work of the African American freedom movements had made white liberals and white conservatives very uncomfortable. Liberals were questioning whether integration could solve some the deeper problems of economic inequality. And by the late 1960s, conservatives were calling for increased law and order.

Across the political spectrum, people looked to Asian Americans — in this case, Japanese and Chinese Americans — as an example of a solution, as a template for other minority groups to follow: “Look how they ended up! They’re doing just fine. And they did it all without political protests.”

That isn’t really true, by the way. Asian Americans did get political, but sometimes their efforts didn’t get seen or recognized.

These stereotypes about Asian Americans being patriotic, having an orderly family, not having delinquency or crime — they became seen as the opposite of what “blackness” represented to many Americans at the time.

I would say it also costs the majority less to allow Asian Americans, who were still a very small part of the population, to let them play out this saga of upward mobility, rather than recognizing the rights and claims of African Americans during that same time.

I’m not saying somebody sat down and did a cost-benefit analysis. But in some ways, there seemed to be a big payoff for little risk. Even with the overturning of the exclusion laws, it’s not like large numbers of Asians were coming into the United States at the time. Asian Americans at that time were still a pretty marginal part of the population.

As harmful as Asian exclusion was, I would agree that those structures were not as deep or pervasive as anti-black racism. It wouldn’t do as much to change the overall social picture by allowing these small numbers of Asian Americans to move forward. It was easier to do, in some ways, because those exclusion structures were not as pervasive, and the consequences had not been as long-lasting as they had been for African Americans.

A really fascinating part of your book describes how these new Asian stereotypes shaped the Moynihan Report, which infamously blamed the plight of African Americans on “ghetto culture.” I think that is a great example of how this model minority stereotype started to get used against others in the 1960s.

Daniel Moynihan, the author of that report, was a liberal trying to figure out how to solve this huge problem — the status of African Americans in American life.

If you look in the report, there’s not really any mention of Asian Americans. But just a few months before the Moynihan Report came out in the summer of 1965, Moynihan was at a gathering with all these intellectuals and policymakers. They're talking about how Japanese and Chinese Americans were “rather astonishing” because they had thrown off this racial stigma. Moynihan points out that 25 years ago, Asians had been “colored.” Then Moynihan says, “Am I wrong that they have ceased to be colored?”

That was a very striking and powerful moment to me.

I think a lot of people believe that the model minority stereotype came out of the huge surge of highly educated Asians who started coming to the United States after 1965. But as your book shows, I think, the causality actually runs the other way.

It’s mutually reinforcing. At the time that the United States did this major immigration law overhaul in 1965, policymakers decided that the nation should select its immigrants based on how they could contribute to the economy (and also to reunify families). So what we start to see is people coming to the United States with these credentials and backgrounds and training, and they seem to confirm some of the ideas that are already there — that Asian Americans are model minorities.

My book stops in the late 1960s, but what I think has happened since then is that the model minority stereotype story has really shifted away from the original ideas of patriotism and anti-communism. We now fixate more on education. There’s the image of the tiger mom focused on getting her kid into Harvard. That emphasis also speaks to a shift in the American economy, how upward mobility really depends on having a certain kind of educational training.

And the anxieties about Asians have never really gone away. Now they’re portrayed as our global competitors. So underlying the praise there’s also this fear.

Sometimes in America, it feels like there are only so many racial buckets that people can fall into. With increased immigration from South Asia and Southeast Asia, for instance, it seemed like lot of the newcomers were swept up into this model minority narrative.

What happened in 1965 is that we opened up the gates to large-scale immigration from places like Latin America, the Caribbean and Asia. From Asia, you get large numbers of people coming from South Asia, the Philippines, Korea. Then by the 1970s, the United States is fighting a war in Southeast Asia, so you get this refugee migrant stream. And you’re right, they’re stepping into this predetermined racial landscape, these preconceived notions about how Asians are.

But as a historian, as someone who thinks about race in American life for a living, I also think that the “model minority” category has only a limited usefulness now in terms of our analysis. We talk about it as a common stereotype, but it doesn’t explain the whole scope of Asian American life today — especially since 9/11, when you have communities of South Asians who are Muslims or Sikhs now being racially targeted or labeled as terrorists. So that has become another stereotype of Asians these days.

I think that underscores maybe the meta-narrative of your book — how we in America have always viewed ethnic and racial minorities through the lens of politics and geopolitics, right? In terms of international relations, in terms of what kind of image we want to project to the world, and in terms of what our national anxieties about other countries are.

Absolutely, that’s the link. The model minority stereotype and the terrorist stereotype are related, I agree, in how they speak to the geopolitical anxieties of their times.

Thanks again for sharing @Puddn !
Back to top
Forum :  Topic : What Advice Do You Have for Lil Nas X?

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: What Advice Do You Have for Lil Nas X?

4 days ago

Please do not date or marry a caucasian...

#rememberingMichaelSam

4 days ago

. . .
.
.
.
.
. . . . .. this "advice" has no legitimate rationale to it... it's based on closemindedness and neuroticism ... this mindset won't take you far in life...

4 days ago

i disagree, i'm further than you...

4 days ago

. .
.
.
. .oh... you disagree?
.
.
. .. . tell me the legitimate rationale as to why this man should take your advice.
.
.
. .. . . . . . further more, it's *farther.... as in you're *farther than me... and congratulations on being *farther than me. i'm sure it'll help you to explicate a reasonable rationale to exclude based on race.

4 days ago

He shouldn't...he should do what he feels is best...

Why asre you in a mood with me..

Ultimately, its my opinion...you know it...and thats kinda the END.

4 days ago

..
.
.
. . . . What mood?
.
. . . . don't u think me entreating you to make better, opend minded decisions will positively impact your life?

4 days ago

Some of us had open-minds and hearts, but learned certain lessons of life through experience. Choosing to stick with ones one kind can be the result of bad experiences, and experiencing the divisive power of race in relationships.

You should not judge someone else's choices if you do not know their story. Racism is real, and race in America remains and always has been a factor when if comes to inter-racial relationships. Asians were not allowed to marry white folks until 1967 after Loving v. Virginia, same as us blacks. That decision struck down all "anti-miscegenation" laws prior to that time, which made it illegal for inter-racial sex and marriage to protect white folk's sense of superiority.

White supremacy and racism in America is not a myth, is not the result of lack of enlightenment, and it is not a figment of people's imagination unfortunately.

3 days ago

.. .
.

.
.
. . .. . . . do you think Nas X, who's barely out of his teen years, have gone thru those kinds of problems where it caused him to be some sort of race cynic, only sticking to his own?
.
.
. . . . are you aware that the other half of Nas X's success, Old Town Rd, is a middle aged White man?
.
.
. . .. . . if him collaborating with a white man yield such success... do you think it's in Nas X's character to even for one second, to consider such a retarded advice as to preclude whites in his life?

3 days ago

I believe the post you reacted negatively to, he advised Nas, do not date or marry a white man. He said nothing about not working or collaborating with them. There is a difference. And that might be sage advice from someone who has had negative experiences dating white folks. I could very easily give that advice myself, and back it up. But I would not, because some things I believe one should experience firsthand to understand. But that is just me.

3 days ago

. .
.
.
. . .
. . . .... What do you think a marriage is? lol . . .


.
.
. . . . .. . . . . . You've never had any negative experiences in dating anyone else? Everyone else, except white men, were smooth sailing?

3 days ago

You miss the point, the point is the context. White Americans have separated themselves from the rest of us until recently. When I was seven years old, these personal relationships you support were untenable in some parts of the US, because of white supremacy laws on the books.

Now you seem to think there is no difference between relations between minorities and between a white person and a minority. You ignore reality in your insistence that we all be open to it NOW, when just recently it was illegal by their choice.

Sorry but you insult history and context by your insistence, and many people disagree, and feel no need to explain it to you; other than remind you to look at the current state of blacks in America, and the current advantages enjoyed by white Americans, largely due to their TAKEN advantage.

I am glad you have found acceptance in corporate America and everything is going well for you, but you are the exception. Those opportunities you accept and flaunt are not open to most of us by design.

There is a history here, and consequences from that history that linger, not to mention the continuance of that line of supremacy in more subtle ways, which you refuse to see.

And no amount of pulling oneself up by ones bootstraps will overcome the disparity for most blacks, if that were even possible.

Whites do not live in my neighborhood. They probably do not live n Nas' neighborhood, unless his new-found money has transplanted him to theirs. For a forumer to warn him to be careful of the trappings of success and the acceptance that will bring him, is not something you in their world have the necessary perspective to criticize.

We have seen many blacks move into their world and find acceptance, while they are there, only to be dropped, when their money falls away, and their elevation recedes. You are a banker, and Asian, so you have the where-with-all to maintain yourself in their space. Nas probably does not. He could easily become the next Michael Sam. It is more than fair to warn him to be careful with his heart.

And it is sad to listen to you try to admonish the other forumer for doing so. The advice you gave Nas was perfect from you. The advice the other forumer was perfect coming from him. Your criticism of his advice was ignorant, ignorant of context, and ignorant of Nas' highly possible situation.

3 days ago

. .
.
.
.
.. . oh ok . .. . keep wallowing in your self created victimization.. . .
,
.
.
. . . .. and fixated upon the white man's mistreatment... as if any groups of people with african ancestry don't stratify themselves against outsiders...
.
.
. . . .I've seen more black boys get the shit beat out of them by other black ppl by being on the wrong blocs than any white men harassing blk ppl.... in fact, statistics re enforces this.... would you like for me to research this for you?
.
. . . . . . and you think you could've become who you are or amassed what you have by living in any sovereignty where the predominant group is people of african ancestry? lol... delusional....
.
. . . . but hey... "I think, therefore I am...." you have the right to be a victim... you have the right to the conjecture that life with the white man is much more horrible than life with men of African ancestry.... it's you who has to deal with the consequences of these thoughts.... not anyone else.

3 days ago

Code:
Self-created victimization


That says it all for me. I know how you think.

Disparities in educational opportunity, criminal justice system laws and their implementation, wealth gap, housing, income, healthcare, are not wholly self-created. They are largely the result of generations of racism and power being held in white hands.

No need for further discussion. I said what I said. The other forumer gave his good advice, you gave your good avice, and now like those in your position, you feel the need and the power to criticize others who think and whose experiences are different from yours.

Like I said I am glad you have made it, and don't feel like a victim as a result of your "earned" success. But you really do not know other people's lives, and the delusion is on your part, thinking you do.

I am not a victim. I, like you, have made it. But unlike you I know my success was partly a glitch in the system, not just the result of my IQ and hard work. I see that the deck is stacked, and acknowledge that race is a very real factor in America, that there are real victims of racism, and class, and that sometimes no amount of struggle can overcome that.

My solution is not to blame the "victims" or ignore reality, but to demand that the obstacles be removed, that reparations be made, IN ADDITION TO encouraging people to work hard and grind.

Unlike you, I am not calling your truth wrong, I am simply saying it is dishonest in its incompleteness and myopia.

3 days ago

.. .
.
.
.
. oh dat sounds so horrible.... can you point to the world any country where people of African ancestry are more prosperous than those who reside in horrible injusticeful America? lol .. . .
.
.
.
. . . .. . . also, random fact, there are more black millionaires in the city of Atlanta than there are all of subsaharan africa, combined.... what a horrible place for blk ppl, who want to prosper, to work and live... :/

I don\'t think the money itself is the issue. The problem is the flagrant disparity in wealth and income. I lived in AFrica for a little while. Extemely poor people were very happy there. They have much less than many of the non-homeless folks have in the black inner-city ghettos here. They were in it together. Families looked out for one another and their neighbors as many of us do here in the hood. The difference is the promise of American prosperity denied, while seeing the overwhelming whiteness of the faces of those who are prospering in the same city.

But again you shifted the issue to avoid the fact that racism does exist and it is a factor. Because some blacks make it to the middle class despite racism in America, and because there is more black with some money in the richest country on earth than in the poor countries of Africa, does not mean racism does not exist and is not a problem in America.

I hear what you are saying, but you still deny what some of us are saying.
Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Immigration\'s negative impact on Native Blacks

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: Immigration\'s negative impact on Native Blacks

3 days ago

@trast

The real secret to Asian American success was not education

For those who doubt that racial resentment lingers in this nation, Asian Americans are a favorite talking point. The argument goes something like this: If “white privilege” is so oppressive — if the United States is so hostile toward its minorities — why do census figures show that Asian Americans out-earn everyone?

In a 2014 editorial, conservative commentator Bill O'Reilly pointed out that Asian household incomes were 20 percent higher than white household incomes on average. “So, do we have Asian privilege in America?” he asked. Of course not, he said. The real reason that Asians are “succeeding far more than African-Americans and even more than white Americans” is that “their families are intact and education is paramount,” he said.

This claim has been with us since at least the 1960s, when it served as a popular rejoinder to the challenges issued by the civil rights movement. Many newspapers printed flattering portraits of Asian Americans to cast skepticism on the people marching for economic and social justice.


“At a time when it is being proposed that hundreds of billions be spent to uplift the Negroes and other minorities, the nation’s 300,000 Chinese-Americans are moving ahead on their own,” claimed a 1966 story in the U.S. News and World Report, which noted their “strict discipline” and “traditional virtues.”

To the extent that all myths are rooted in truth, this model minority stereotype recognizes a real pattern of Asian upward mobility. A century ago, Asian Americans were known as laborers of the lowest wage. They were ditch diggers, launderers, miners. Yet over the decades, despite poverty, racial violence and widespread discrimination, many Asians managed to clamber up the socioeconomic ladder.

Until now, the story of how that happened has been poorly understood.

“The widespread assumption is that Asian Americans came to the United States very disadvantaged, and they wound up advantaged through extraordinary investments in their children’s education,” says Brown University economist Nathaniel Hilger.


But that's not what really happened, he says.

Hilger recently used old census records to trace the fortunes of whites, blacks and Asians who were born in California during the early- to mid-20th century. He found that educational gains had little to do with how Asian Americans managed to close the wage gap with whites by the 1970s.

Instead, his research suggests that society simply became less racist toward Asians.

Asian Americans have been part of the United States for most of its history. The first major wave of immigrants came in the 1800s, when Chinese laborers flocked to California to help build railroads. Their presence soon stirred up resentments among white Americans. The Chinese Massacre of 1871, which took place in the streets of Los Angeles, counts among the largest lynchings in U.S. history.


Asians in the United States have often endured racism. The internment of Japanese Americans during World War II is one of the most infamous examples. (Russell Lee, April 1942, Los Angeles. Library of Congress)
In 1882, Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, which shut the door on the influx of low-skilled Chinese labor. By 1924, nearly all immigration from Asian nations was banned. Despite widespread discrimination, many families remained, settling mostly in California. Opinion surveys from that era show that whites expressed extreme prejudice against both Asian and African Americans. Asians also lived in segregated neighborhoods and often sent their children to segregated schools. To survive, many opened their own businesses because no one would employ them.


Hilger’s research focuses on native-born whites, blacks and Asians to rule out the effects of subsequent immigration. In 1965, changing laws ushered in a surge of high-skilled, high-earning Asian workers, who now account for most of the Asians living in the United States today.

But even before the arrival of those highly educated immigrants, the Asians already living in the United States had more or less closed the wage gap with whites.

At the time of the 1940 census, Hilger found, California-born Asian men earned less than California-born black men. By the 1970 census, they were earning about the same as white men, and by the 1980 census, the native-born Asian men were out-earning white men.

Throughout this time, many Asian American families did invest, increasingly, in their children's education. But Hilger discovered that the improvements in educational attainment were too modest to explain how Asians' earnings grew so fast.


The picture became much clearer when he compared people with similar levels of education. Hilger found that in the 1940s, Asian men were paid less than white men with the same amount of schooling. But by the 1980s, that gap had mostly disappeared.

“Asians used to be paid like blacks,” Hilger said. “But between 1940 and 1970, they started to get paid like whites.” The charts below shows average earnings for native-born black, white and Asian depending on how much education they had.


(Nathaniel Hilger)
In 1980, for instance, even Asian high school dropouts were earning about as much as white high school dropouts, and vastly more than black high school dropouts. This dramatic shift had nothing to do with Asians accruing more education. Instead, Hilger points to the slow dismantling of discriminatory institutions after World War II, and the softening of racist prejudices. That’s the same the explanation advanced by economists Harriet Orcutt Duleep and Seth Sanders, who found that in the second half of the 20th century, Asian Americans not only started to work in more lucrative industries, but also started to get paid more for the same kind of work.


In other words, the remarkable upward mobility of California-born Asians wasn’t about superior schooling (not yet, anyway). It was the result of Asians finally receiving better opportunities — finally earning equal pay for equal skills and equal work.

Why couldn’t African Americans close the wage gap? It’s hard to say. Hilger found some evidence that there were underlying differences in skill. Between Asians and African Americans with the same amount of schooling, African Americans tended to achieve lower scores on military enlistment tests during the 1940s.

But it’s also likely that postwar racial attitudes shifted differently for Asians than for African Americans. In the 1850s, newspapers in California complained that Chinese immigrants were the dregs of the laboring class, having “most of the vices and few of the virtues of the African.” Yet by the 1960s, attitudes had completely flipped. Journalists praised Asians for being hard workers who cherished education, kept their heads down and rarely complained.


“Still being taught in Chinatown is the old idea that people should depend on their own efforts — not a welfare check — in order to reach America’s ‘promised land,’” the 1966 U.S. News and World Report article said.

Since then, waves of high-skill immigration have further cemented the stereotype of Asians as a studious, well-off demographic. Highly educated parents encourage their children to become highly educated, compounding the advantage. About half of Asian Americans over the age of 25 now hold college degrees, compared with only 28 percent of Americans overall.

Hilger's research found that 50 years ago, Asians were held back primarily by lack of opportunities. Now that discrimination against Asians has lessened somewhat, the Asian edge in education is apparent: Average incomes among Asians Americans are higher because Asian Americans have higher rates of college attainment. (To be clear, we are talking about averages only. As a group, Asian Americans have considerable socioeconomic diversity.)


But if we take a page from Hilger and focus on people with similar educational backgrounds, the residual disadvantages become clear. Asians actually earn 5 percent less compared with whites who also have advanced degrees — while blacks and Hispanics earn 20 percent less.


This is one of several problems with the model minority myth. (Here’s another.) Many people hold up Asian Americans as proof that hard work and education leads to success no matter your skin color. On the contrary, these statistics show that being a minority in the United States often means working harder to earn less.

More education will help close racial wage gaps somewhat, but it will not resolve problems of denied opportunity. In fact, recent studies suggest that income disparities are growing at the very top between blacks and whites. According to an Economic Policy Institute report from September, the difference between what a white college graduate earns and what a black college graduate earns has widened since the 1980s.


Emphasizing the power of educational attainment also obscures the barriers that remain. Despite the complaints of Stephen K. Bannon, President-elect Donald Trump’s alt-right adviser who’s a darling of white supremacy groups, it is simply false that “two-thirds or three-quarters of the CEOs in Silicon Valley are from South Asia or from Asia.” Even among technology companies, which hire a disproportionate number of Asian workers, Asians are vastly underrepresented in upper management. Yet, the model minority myth makes a statement like Bannon's feel true to many.

Asian Americans — some of them at least — have made tremendous progress in the United States. But the greatest thing that ever happened to them wasn't that they studied hard, or that they benefited from tiger moms or Confucian values. It's that other Americans started treating them with a little more respect.

3 days ago

. .
.
. . yes I agree....
.
.
. . . the white man is omnipresent and omnipotent... .. .
.
.
. . . .no group on this Earth may succeed without their unilateral acknowledgement and permission....
.
.
. .. . they alone hold the secrets to all knowledge and these "opportunities" .... and the Asians, somehow, have landed on their good grace, ... they love asians so much that they've given them even better treatment and opportunities for themselves.... how magnanimous is that????
.
.
. .. . . . . . also... you seem to think that by merely being presented opportunities, one becomes successful...it's as if it's somesort of fail proof ideology someone has implanted in your head... proly the democrats... but that's false, and you know it.
.
.
. . .close your eyes and recall your gradeschool class... all of those kids... presented the same opportunities... but why do their grades differ? by your logic, all of them should succeed the same rate... since they're all presented with the same opportunities? right.... that's the shit I saw in highschool.... every single kid costing the district $19,000 per year, yet a significant portion of the kids were more interested in hangin out, fighting, pussy, everyting under the sun except the free books they got and free instruction.
.
. . . . also also... explain to me your logic... there are hundreds if not thousands of sociological research and news articles that points to education and the focus on education as being the main income driver.... but you bypassed this massive body of knowledge & research to find one Washington Post article that says Asian American success is due to the grace of Whites... and you chose this ONE article of a whole body of knowledge to believe....
Why?

Again as usual you overlook what you do not want to see. It does not say only that at all. It says Education is a vital factor at some points in history, but also at others it was not a factor and that racism was the factor.

Life is more complicated than you want it to be. It is not that you are entirely wrong, but you refuse to see or acknowledge other issues.

Education is a factor, but then so is race. Interning folks, racially barring them from admission to the US, really happened to Asian people. Those things are real. They were actual victims, no self-proclaimed victims.

Like I said it is great you made it, despite the odds, and maybe you think anyone can do the same if they work hard, and do what you did, but that simply is not true. We need our store-shelvers, our garbage collectors, our underclass. Not everyone can "make it." to six figure salaries. Who makes is and who does not make is not accidental. People in charge decide that. Agreed black folks who are not into the books make it easier for them, but the choice is still in their hands. They reject resumes with black sounding names, fill selection committees with themselves, who judge based on their experiences.

You are not wrong, but you are not entirely right. Not taking advantage of limited educational opportunities is BAD, but denying an applicant opportunity based on a black sounding name really happens, is race discrimination, and is also bad.
Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Immigration\'s negative impact on Native Blacks

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: Immigration\'s negative impact on Native Blacks

3 days ago

@trast

The real secret to Asian American success was not education

For those who doubt that racial resentment lingers in this nation, Asian Americans are a favorite talking point. The argument goes something like this: If “white privilege” is so oppressive — if the United States is so hostile toward its minorities — why do census figures show that Asian Americans out-earn everyone?

In a 2014 editorial, conservative commentator Bill O'Reilly pointed out that Asian household incomes were 20 percent higher than white household incomes on average. “So, do we have Asian privilege in America?” he asked. Of course not, he said. The real reason that Asians are “succeeding far more than African-Americans and even more than white Americans” is that “their families are intact and education is paramount,” he said.

This claim has been with us since at least the 1960s, when it served as a popular rejoinder to the challenges issued by the civil rights movement. Many newspapers printed flattering portraits of Asian Americans to cast skepticism on the people marching for economic and social justice.


“At a time when it is being proposed that hundreds of billions be spent to uplift the Negroes and other minorities, the nation’s 300,000 Chinese-Americans are moving ahead on their own,” claimed a 1966 story in the U.S. News and World Report, which noted their “strict discipline” and “traditional virtues.”

To the extent that all myths are rooted in truth, this model minority stereotype recognizes a real pattern of Asian upward mobility. A century ago, Asian Americans were known as laborers of the lowest wage. They were ditch diggers, launderers, miners. Yet over the decades, despite poverty, racial violence and widespread discrimination, many Asians managed to clamber up the socioeconomic ladder.

Until now, the story of how that happened has been poorly understood.

“The widespread assumption is that Asian Americans came to the United States very disadvantaged, and they wound up advantaged through extraordinary investments in their children’s education,” says Brown University economist Nathaniel Hilger.


But that's not what really happened, he says.

Hilger recently used old census records to trace the fortunes of whites, blacks and Asians who were born in California during the early- to mid-20th century. He found that educational gains had little to do with how Asian Americans managed to close the wage gap with whites by the 1970s.

Instead, his research suggests that society simply became less racist toward Asians.

Asian Americans have been part of the United States for most of its history. The first major wave of immigrants came in the 1800s, when Chinese laborers flocked to California to help build railroads. Their presence soon stirred up resentments among white Americans. The Chinese Massacre of 1871, which took place in the streets of Los Angeles, counts among the largest lynchings in U.S. history.


Asians in the United States have often endured racism. The internment of Japanese Americans during World War II is one of the most infamous examples. (Russell Lee, April 1942, Los Angeles. Library of Congress)
In 1882, Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, which shut the door on the influx of low-skilled Chinese labor. By 1924, nearly all immigration from Asian nations was banned. Despite widespread discrimination, many families remained, settling mostly in California. Opinion surveys from that era show that whites expressed extreme prejudice against both Asian and African Americans. Asians also lived in segregated neighborhoods and often sent their children to segregated schools. To survive, many opened their own businesses because no one would employ them.


Hilger’s research focuses on native-born whites, blacks and Asians to rule out the effects of subsequent immigration. In 1965, changing laws ushered in a surge of high-skilled, high-earning Asian workers, who now account for most of the Asians living in the United States today.

But even before the arrival of those highly educated immigrants, the Asians already living in the United States had more or less closed the wage gap with whites.

At the time of the 1940 census, Hilger found, California-born Asian men earned less than California-born black men. By the 1970 census, they were earning about the same as white men, and by the 1980 census, the native-born Asian men were out-earning white men.

Throughout this time, many Asian American families did invest, increasingly, in their children's education. But Hilger discovered that the improvements in educational attainment were too modest to explain how Asians' earnings grew so fast.


The picture became much clearer when he compared people with similar levels of education. Hilger found that in the 1940s, Asian men were paid less than white men with the same amount of schooling. But by the 1980s, that gap had mostly disappeared.

“Asians used to be paid like blacks,” Hilger said. “But between 1940 and 1970, they started to get paid like whites.” The charts below shows average earnings for native-born black, white and Asian depending on how much education they had.


(Nathaniel Hilger)
In 1980, for instance, even Asian high school dropouts were earning about as much as white high school dropouts, and vastly more than black high school dropouts. This dramatic shift had nothing to do with Asians accruing more education. Instead, Hilger points to the slow dismantling of discriminatory institutions after World War II, and the softening of racist prejudices. That’s the same the explanation advanced by economists Harriet Orcutt Duleep and Seth Sanders, who found that in the second half of the 20th century, Asian Americans not only started to work in more lucrative industries, but also started to get paid more for the same kind of work.


In other words, the remarkable upward mobility of California-born Asians wasn’t about superior schooling (not yet, anyway). It was the result of Asians finally receiving better opportunities — finally earning equal pay for equal skills and equal work.

Why couldn’t African Americans close the wage gap? It’s hard to say. Hilger found some evidence that there were underlying differences in skill. Between Asians and African Americans with the same amount of schooling, African Americans tended to achieve lower scores on military enlistment tests during the 1940s.

But it’s also likely that postwar racial attitudes shifted differently for Asians than for African Americans. In the 1850s, newspapers in California complained that Chinese immigrants were the dregs of the laboring class, having “most of the vices and few of the virtues of the African.” Yet by the 1960s, attitudes had completely flipped. Journalists praised Asians for being hard workers who cherished education, kept their heads down and rarely complained.


“Still being taught in Chinatown is the old idea that people should depend on their own efforts — not a welfare check — in order to reach America’s ‘promised land,’” the 1966 U.S. News and World Report article said.

Since then, waves of high-skill immigration have further cemented the stereotype of Asians as a studious, well-off demographic. Highly educated parents encourage their children to become highly educated, compounding the advantage. About half of Asian Americans over the age of 25 now hold college degrees, compared with only 28 percent of Americans overall.

Hilger's research found that 50 years ago, Asians were held back primarily by lack of opportunities. Now that discrimination against Asians has lessened somewhat, the Asian edge in education is apparent: Average incomes among Asians Americans are higher because Asian Americans have higher rates of college attainment. (To be clear, we are talking about averages only. As a group, Asian Americans have considerable socioeconomic diversity.)


But if we take a page from Hilger and focus on people with similar educational backgrounds, the residual disadvantages become clear. Asians actually earn 5 percent less compared with whites who also have advanced degrees — while blacks and Hispanics earn 20 percent less.


This is one of several problems with the model minority myth. (Here’s another.) Many people hold up Asian Americans as proof that hard work and education leads to success no matter your skin color. On the contrary, these statistics show that being a minority in the United States often means working harder to earn less.

More education will help close racial wage gaps somewhat, but it will not resolve problems of denied opportunity. In fact, recent studies suggest that income disparities are growing at the very top between blacks and whites. According to an Economic Policy Institute report from September, the difference between what a white college graduate earns and what a black college graduate earns has widened since the 1980s.


Emphasizing the power of educational attainment also obscures the barriers that remain. Despite the complaints of Stephen K. Bannon, President-elect Donald Trump’s alt-right adviser who’s a darling of white supremacy groups, it is simply false that “two-thirds or three-quarters of the CEOs in Silicon Valley are from South Asia or from Asia.” Even among technology companies, which hire a disproportionate number of Asian workers, Asians are vastly underrepresented in upper management. Yet, the model minority myth makes a statement like Bannon's feel true to many.

Asian Americans — some of them at least — have made tremendous progress in the United States. But the greatest thing that ever happened to them wasn't that they studied hard, or that they benefited from tiger moms or Confucian values. It's that other Americans started treating them with a little more respect.

That explains much! Very enlightening. Thanks for sharing @puddn !
Back to top
Forum :  Topic : What Advice Do You Have for Lil Nas X?

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: What Advice Do You Have for Lil Nas X?

4 days ago

This guy was broke, gay (while surrounded by homophobic black people,) not going to school, getting kicked out of his sister's place, and couldn't live with his parents (cuz he didn't go back to school.) On Halloween, he bought a beat, and wrote a song that stayed #1 on the top 100 for 19 weeks (nobody else has ever written a song that did this.) All along the way, he was pushing that song hard. He figured out how to push this song to number #1 (with no money.) A lot of the online methods he used were learned while being a known online personality for 2-3 years before that. He ran a site dedicated to Nicky Minag. He was doing all sort of creative stuff online for 2-3 years before he wrote this song. He leaves that part out in interviews. If you go to his Twitter or Instagram you will see pretty much a wave of creative stuff. This guy is really creative, really smart, and he can charm his ass off. This ain't some dumb fag. Like most all Narcissists he loves animals, and gets easily bored. So, he will have to have best friends that have A.D.D., because he won't be able to predict what they will do. Also, people with A.D.D. have excellent taste because nothing but good stuff can hold their attention. Narcissists take advantage of that while all the time keeping the people with A.D.D. from being "too well liked" (by highlighting their many deficits.)....Anyways. He ain't going back to being poor. That shit is over. This is a creative-as-fuck fag who figures out puzzles.

You know more about him than I do. I wish the kid luck in any event.

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Immigration\'s negative impact on Native Blacks

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: Immigration\'s negative impact on Native Blacks

3 days ago

@trast

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/11/19/the-real-secret-to-asian-american-success-was-not-education/

Thanks @puddn !

I will get a subscription of the Post and check it out later.
Back to top
Forum :  Topic : What Advice Do You Have for Lil Nas X?

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: What Advice Do You Have for Lil Nas X?

4 days ago

Please do not date or marry a caucasian...

#rememberingMichaelSam

4 days ago

. . .
.
.
.
.
. . . . .. this "advice" has no legitimate rationale to it... it's based on closemindedness and neuroticism ... this mindset won't take you far in life...

4 days ago

i disagree, i'm further than you...

4 days ago

. .
.
.
. .oh... you disagree?
.
.
. .. . tell me the legitimate rationale as to why this man should take your advice.
.
.
. .. . . . . . further more, it's *farther.... as in you're *farther than me... and congratulations on being *farther than me. i'm sure it'll help you to explicate a reasonable rationale to exclude based on race.

4 days ago

He shouldn't...he should do what he feels is best...

Why asre you in a mood with me..

Ultimately, its my opinion...you know it...and thats kinda the END.

4 days ago

..
.
.
. . . . What mood?
.
. . . . don't u think me entreating you to make better, opend minded decisions will positively impact your life?

4 days ago

Some of us had open-minds and hearts, but learned certain lessons of life through experience. Choosing to stick with ones one kind can be the result of bad experiences, and experiencing the divisive power of race in relationships.

You should not judge someone else's choices if you do not know their story. Racism is real, and race in America remains and always has been a factor when if comes to inter-racial relationships. Asians were not allowed to marry white folks until 1967 after Loving v. Virginia, same as us blacks. That decision struck down all "anti-miscegenation" laws prior to that time, which made it illegal for inter-racial sex and marriage to protect white folk's sense of superiority.

White supremacy and racism in America is not a myth, is not the result of lack of enlightenment, and it is not a figment of people's imagination unfortunately.

3 days ago

.. .
.

.
.
. . .. . . . do you think Nas X, who's barely out of his teen years, have gone thru those kinds of problems where it caused him to be some sort of race cynic, only sticking to his own?
.
.
. . . . are you aware that the other half of Nas X's success, Old Town Rd, is a middle aged White man?
.
.
. . .. . . if him collaborating with a white man yield such success... do you think it's in Nas X's character to even for one second, to consider such a retarded advice as to preclude whites in his life?

3 days ago

I believe the post you reacted negatively to, he advised Nas, do not date or marry a white man. He said nothing about not working or collaborating with them. There is a difference. And that might be sage advice from someone who has had negative experiences dating white folks. I could very easily give that advice myself, and back it up. But I would not, because some things I believe one should experience firsthand to understand. But that is just me.

3 days ago

. .
.
.
. . .
. . . .... What do you think a marriage is? lol . . .


.
.
. . . . .. . . . . . You've never had any negative experiences in dating anyone else? Everyone else, except white men, were smooth sailing?

3 days ago

You miss the point, the point is the context. White Americans have separated themselves from the rest of us until recently. When I was seven years old, these personal relationships you support were untenable in some parts of the US, because of white supremacy laws on the books.

Now you seem to think there is no difference between relations between minorities and between a white person and a minority. You ignore reality in your insistence that we all be open to it NOW, when just recently it was illegal by their choice.

Sorry but you insult history and context by your insistence, and many people disagree, and feel no need to explain it to you; other than remind you to look at the current state of blacks in America, and the current advantages enjoyed by white Americans, largely due to their TAKEN advantage.

I am glad you have found acceptance in corporate America and everything is going well for you, but you are the exception. Those opportunities you accept and flaunt are not open to most of us by design.

There is a history here, and consequences from that history that linger, not to mention the continuance of that line of supremacy in more subtle ways, which you refuse to see.

And no amount of pulling oneself up by ones bootstraps will overcome the disparity for most blacks, if that were even possible.

Whites do not live in my neighborhood. They probably do not live n Nas' neighborhood, unless his new-found money has transplanted him to theirs. For a forumer to warn him to be careful of the trappings of success and the acceptance that will bring him, is not something you in their world have the necessary perspective to criticize.

We have seen many blacks move into their world and find acceptance, while they are there, only to be dropped, when their money falls away, and their elevation recedes. You are a banker, and Asian, so you have the where-with-all to maintain yourself in their space. Nas probably does not. He could easily become the next Michael Sam. It is more than fair to warn him to be careful with his heart.

And it is sad to listen to you try to admonish the other forumer for doing so. The advice you gave Nas was perfect from you. The advice the other forumer was perfect coming from him. Your criticism of his advice was ignorant, ignorant of context, and ignorant of Nas' highly possible situation.

3 days ago

. .
.
.
.
.. . oh ok . .. . keep wallowing in your self created victimization.. . .
,
.
.
. . . .. and fixated upon the white man's mistreatment... as if any groups of people with african ancestry don't stratify themselves against outsiders...
.
.
. . . .I've seen more black boys get the shit beat out of them by other black ppl by being on the wrong blocs than any white men harassing blk ppl.... in fact, statistics re enforces this.... would you like for me to research this for you?
.
. . . . . . and you think you could've become who you are or amassed what you have by living in any sovereignty where the predominant group is people of african ancestry? lol... delusional....
.
. . . . but hey... "I think, therefore I am...." you have the right to be a victim... you have the right to the conjecture that life with the white man is much more horrible than life with men of African ancestry.... it's you who has to deal with the consequences of these thoughts.... not anyone else.

Code:
Self-created victimization


That says it all for me. I know how you think.

Disparities in educational opportunity, criminal justice system laws and their implementation, wealth gap, housing, income, healthcare, are not wholly self-created. They are largely the result of generations of racism and power being held in white hands.

No need for further discussion. I said what I said. The other forumer gave his good advice, you gave your good avice, and now like those in your position, you feel the need and the power to criticize others who think and whose experiences are different from yours.

Like I said I am glad you have made it, and don't feel like a victim as a result of your "earned" success. But you really do not know other people's lives, and the delusion is on your part, thinking you do.

I am not a victim. I, like you, have made it. But unlike you I know my success was partly a glitch in the system, not just the result of my IQ and hard work. I see that the deck is stacked, and acknowledge that race is a very real factor in America, that there are real victims of racism, and class, and that sometimes no amount of struggle can overcome that.

My solution is not to blame the "victims" or ignore reality, but to demand that the obstacles be removed, that reparations be made, IN ADDITION TO encouraging people to work hard and grind.

Unlike you, I am not calling your truth wrong, I am simply saying it is dishonest in its incompleteness and myopia.
Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Immigration\'s negative impact on Native Blacks

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: Immigration\'s negative impact on Native Blacks

3 days ago

Like all good stories, there are some verifiable truths to what he says, but sorting out the truth from the rest seems a monumental task, and...


3 days ago

Worth researching.

If true, then we are fucked as blacks!

3 days ago

yes, but it would be a lot of work. If you are interested in sorting it out, I might advise looking for critics of the Dr. if you find some, and listen to their counter-arguments. I appreciate your posting it. It was thought provoking, and interesting, but when he offered books and other things for sale, I got even more disconnected.

Unfortunately I would not be surprised if there is a lot more truth to his story than I am willing to accept at this point.

3 days ago

Dr.Claud's theorizing is in line with something I posted a while ago about how America became less racist to Asians during the height of Jim Crow.Italians have also gained access to whiteness even though, Chris Cuomo was subject to racist ethnic slur of "Fredo" recently.

Why has America allowed these groups to access whiteness?

I work with an Lebanese who admits his father looks non white yet he ide identifies as white!

Is aligning with immigrants a form to fill out f anti-blackness? Instead of coming together for real as blacks, we are "minorities" and "people of color".

I will find that article about Asians!

Yes, Asians are in a different niche from other minorities, largely due to their access to education. They outperform most whites vying for admission to Ivy league schools. Whites want to say they are doing blacks a favor by allowing diversity at college campuses. The reality is they are keeping seats open for themselves by doing so, because Asians would take up many more of their spots if admissions were based solely on academic performance. Asians grind. I have seen bar exam rooms filled with them.
Back to top
Forum :  Topic : What Advice Do You Have for Lil Nas X?

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: What Advice Do You Have for Lil Nas X?

4 days ago

Please do not date or marry a caucasian...

#rememberingMichaelSam

4 days ago

. . .
.
.
.
.
. . . . .. this "advice" has no legitimate rationale to it... it's based on closemindedness and neuroticism ... this mindset won't take you far in life...

4 days ago

i disagree, i'm further than you...

4 days ago

. .
.
.
. .oh... you disagree?
.
.
. .. . tell me the legitimate rationale as to why this man should take your advice.
.
.
. .. . . . . . further more, it's *farther.... as in you're *farther than me... and congratulations on being *farther than me. i'm sure it'll help you to explicate a reasonable rationale to exclude based on race.

4 days ago

He shouldn't...he should do what he feels is best...

Why asre you in a mood with me..

Ultimately, its my opinion...you know it...and thats kinda the END.

4 days ago

..
.
.
. . . . What mood?
.
. . . . don't u think me entreating you to make better, opend minded decisions will positively impact your life?

4 days ago

Some of us had open-minds and hearts, but learned certain lessons of life through experience. Choosing to stick with ones one kind can be the result of bad experiences, and experiencing the divisive power of race in relationships.

You should not judge someone else's choices if you do not know their story. Racism is real, and race in America remains and always has been a factor when if comes to inter-racial relationships. Asians were not allowed to marry white folks until 1967 after Loving v. Virginia, same as us blacks. That decision struck down all "anti-miscegenation" laws prior to that time, which made it illegal for inter-racial sex and marriage to protect white folk's sense of superiority.

White supremacy and racism in America is not a myth, is not the result of lack of enlightenment, and it is not a figment of people's imagination unfortunately.

3 days ago

.. .
.

.
.
. . .. . . . do you think Nas X, who's barely out of his teen years, have gone thru those kinds of problems where it caused him to be some sort of race cynic, only sticking to his own?
.
.
. . . . are you aware that the other half of Nas X's success, Old Town Rd, is a middle aged White man?
.
.
. . .. . . if him collaborating with a white man yield such success... do you think it's in Nas X's character to even for one second, to consider such a retarded advice as to preclude whites in his life?

3 days ago

I believe the post you reacted negatively to, he advised Nas, do not date or marry a white man. He said nothing about not working or collaborating with them. There is a difference. And that might be sage advice from someone who has had negative experiences dating white folks. I could very easily give that advice myself, and back it up. But I would not, because some things I believe one should experience firsthand to understand. But that is just me.

3 days ago

. .
.
.
. . .
. . . .... What do you think a marriage is? lol . . .


.
.
. . . . .. . . . . . You've never had any negative experiences in dating anyone else? Everyone else, except white men, were smooth sailing?

You miss the point, the point is the context. White Americans have separated themselves from the rest of us until recently. When I was seven years old, these personal relationships you support were untenable in some parts of the US, because of white supremacy laws on the books.

Now you seem to think there is no difference between relations between minorities and between a white person and a minority. You ignore reality in your insistence that we all be open to it NOW, when just recently it was illegal by their choice.

Sorry but you insult history and context by your insistence, and many people disagree, and feel no need to explain it to you; other than remind you to look at the current state of blacks in America, and the current advantages enjoyed by white Americans, largely due to their TAKEN advantage.

I am glad you have found acceptance in corporate America and everything is going well for you, but you are the exception. Those opportunities you accept and flaunt are not open to most of us by design.

There is a history here, and consequences from that history that linger, not to mention the continuance of that line of supremacy in more subtle ways, which you refuse to see.

And no amount of pulling oneself up by ones bootstraps will overcome the disparity for most blacks, if that were even possible.

Whites do not live in my neighborhood. They probably do not live n Nas' neighborhood, unless his new-found money has transplanted him to theirs. For a forumer to warn him to be careful of the trappings of success and the acceptance that will bring him, is not something you in their world have the necessary perspective to criticize.

We have seen many blacks move into their world and find acceptance, while they are there, only to be dropped, when their money falls away, and their elevation recedes. You are a banker, and Asian, so you have the where-with-all to maintain yourself in their space. Nas probably does not. He could easily become the next Michael Sam. It is more than fair to warn him to be careful with his heart.

And it is sad to listen to you try to admonish the other forumer for doing so. The advice you gave Nas was perfect from you. The advice the other forumer was perfect coming from him. Your criticism of his advice was ignorant, ignorant of context, and ignorant of Nas' highly possible situation.
Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Anyone else watching...

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: Anyone else watching...

Is this what you are talking about, or is it something else:

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : I support Bruce Springsteen. So I recommend this movie.

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: I support Bruce Springsteen. So I recommend this movie.

I think I remember a post where he has a restaurant and feeds or employs the homeless or something. And I don't think he is one of those with mansions and yachts everywhere and living the life, beyond that of mortal men, like some do, when their money gets large. I think he keeps it down-to-earth, and I respect that.
Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Immigration\'s negative impact on Native Blacks

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: Immigration\'s negative impact on Native Blacks

3 days ago

Like all good stories, there are some verifiable truths to what he says, but sorting out the truth from the rest seems a monumental task, and...


3 days ago

Worth researching.

If true, then we are fucked as blacks!

yes, but it would be a lot of work. If you are interested in sorting it out, I might advise looking for critics of the Dr. if you find some, and listen to their counter-arguments. I appreciate your posting it. It was thought provoking, and interesting, but when he offered books and other things for sale, I got even more disconnected.

Unfortunately I would not be surprised if there is a lot more truth to his story than I am willing to accept at this point.

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : What Advice Do You Have for Lil Nas X?

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: What Advice Do You Have for Lil Nas X?

4 days ago

Please do not date or marry a caucasian...

#rememberingMichaelSam

4 days ago

. . .
.
.
.
.
. . . . .. this "advice" has no legitimate rationale to it... it's based on closemindedness and neuroticism ... this mindset won't take you far in life...

4 days ago

i disagree, i'm further than you...

4 days ago

. .
.
.
. .oh... you disagree?
.
.
. .. . tell me the legitimate rationale as to why this man should take your advice.
.
.
. .. . . . . . further more, it's *farther.... as in you're *farther than me... and congratulations on being *farther than me. i'm sure it'll help you to explicate a reasonable rationale to exclude based on race.

4 days ago

He shouldn't...he should do what he feels is best...

Why asre you in a mood with me..

Ultimately, its my opinion...you know it...and thats kinda the END.

4 days ago

..
.
.
. . . . What mood?
.
. . . . don't u think me entreating you to make better, opend minded decisions will positively impact your life?

4 days ago

Some of us had open-minds and hearts, but learned certain lessons of life through experience. Choosing to stick with ones one kind can be the result of bad experiences, and experiencing the divisive power of race in relationships.

You should not judge someone else's choices if you do not know their story. Racism is real, and race in America remains and always has been a factor when if comes to inter-racial relationships. Asians were not allowed to marry white folks until 1967 after Loving v. Virginia, same as us blacks. That decision struck down all "anti-miscegenation" laws prior to that time, which made it illegal for inter-racial sex and marriage to protect white folk's sense of superiority.

White supremacy and racism in America is not a myth, is not the result of lack of enlightenment, and it is not a figment of people's imagination unfortunately.

3 days ago

.. .
.

.
.
. . .. . . . do you think Nas X, who's barely out of his teen years, have gone thru those kinds of problems where it caused him to be some sort of race cynic, only sticking to his own?
.
.
. . . . are you aware that the other half of Nas X's success, Old Town Rd, is a middle aged White man?
.
.
. . .. . . if him collaborating with a white man yield such success... do you think it's in Nas X's character to even for one second, to consider such a retarded advice as to preclude whites in his life?

I believe the post you reacted negatively to, he advised Nas, do not date or marry a white man. He said nothing about not working or collaborating with them. There is a difference. And that might be sage advice from someone who has had negative experiences dating white folks. I could very easily give that advice myself, and back it up. But I would not, because some things I believe one should experience firsthand to understand. But that is just me.
Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Immigration\'s negative impact on Native Blacks

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: Immigration\'s negative impact on Native Blacks

Like all good stories, there are some verifiable truths to what he says, but sorting out the truth from the rest seems a monumental task, and...


Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Immigration\'s negative impact on Native Blacks

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: Immigration\'s negative impact on Native Blacks

Welp!
Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Do you remember?

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: Do you remember?

Yes, I keep a photo gallery of all my hookups, FWBs, and Exes, and I review it annually.

This is the one I am trying to forget. I was drunk and she took advantage of me. I tore her page out my book, but I still wake up in a cold sweat some nights with flashbacks, and screaming:



Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Pic a Saturday Love!

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: Pic a Saturday Love!

4 days ago

This is all the booty we have available for today.

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Why Black families have NO Wealth!!!!!!!

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: Why Black families have NO Wealth!!!!!!!

And the problem is twofold, because even if you have a little something to leave for your kids, probate eats it up, and lawyers take 1/4 for their services if the inheritance is not self-transferring. And unless it is fully paid for, which most real property still has a mortgage attached at death, then it cannot be setup to transfer automatically without special legal knowledge.

Back to top
Forum :  Topic : Pic a Saturday Love!

trast

Senior
Joined: 2012-06-14 00:46:04
Posts: 33046

Washington
District of Columbia
United States

PostPosted: 3 days ago    Post subject: Pic a Saturday Love!

4 days ago

Too late. It's Sunday. That booty is gone.
First Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Last Page 
 
 


 
Change Online Status: Status Update: